Trayvon Martin’s parents speak out on ‘Today’

Trayvon Martin’s parents speak out on ‘Today’

Trayvon Martin's parents say they're still in shock and disbelief. Photo: Associated Press

MIAMI (AP) — Trayvon Martin’s parents say they’re still in shock and disbelief that jurors acquitted George Zimmerman in the 2012 shooting death of their 17-year-old son.

Martin’s parents made appearances on network morning news shows Thursday.

On NBC’s “Today” show, Sybrina Fulton questioned whether jurors looked at the shooting from her son’s point of view. She says the verdict failed Trayvon, a teenager who was scared.

Martin’s father, Tracy Martin, says they believed the killer of their “unarmed child” was going to be convicted.

It’s the first time they’ve spoken publically since the verdict was announced Saturday following a three-week trial in central Florida.

Zimmerman faced second-degree murder charges. Prosecutors accused Zimmerman, who identifies himself as Hispanic, of profiling Martin, who was black. Zimmerman claimed he shot Martin in self-defense.

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