Nidal Hasan found guilty in Fort Hood shootings

Nidal Hasan found guilty in Fort Hood shootings

Maj. Nidal Hasan has been convicted of murder for the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood. Photo: Associated Press

FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) — Maj. Nidal Hasan has been convicted of premeditated murder for the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood. That means he’s now eligible for the death penalty.

Military jurors found the Army psychiatrist guilty on Friday for the attack that killed 13 people and injured more than 30 others at the Texas military base.

The trial now enters a penalty phase, where prosecutors will ask jurors to sentence Hasan to death.

Hasan is acting as his own attorney. But he didn’t call witnesses or testify, and he questioned only three of prosecutors’ nearly 90 witnesses.

Through media leaks and statements to the judge, the American-born Muslim signaled that he believed the attack was justified as a way to protect Islamic and Taliban leaders from U.S. forces in Afghanistan and Iraq.

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